Survey of Acoustic Systems and Data

INTAROS has developed a series of questionnaires to gather contributions from the wider Arctic community. Here we specifically invite the acoustic community to contribute to the assessment of existing ocean observing systems including acoustics and acoustic data collections.

 

The underwater acoustic environment in the Arctic Ocean and Seas is expected to change under climate change. It is therefore important to collect baseline acoustic data in this regions (see AOS statement 2018) and at the International Quite Ocean Experiment Science plan (IQOE). We kindly ask those who have existing acoustic observing systems or data collections to respond to the questionnaires below.

The survey outcomes will fed into a series of reports and documents produced during INTAROS and by the IQOE, and will contribute to building the integrated Arctic Observing System (iAOS).

 

Questionnaire A: ARCTIC ACOUSTIC OBSERVING SYSTEMS
To collect the information needed to assess the existing Arctic in-situ observing systems in terms of data delivery chain, accessibility, and spatial-temporal coverage.
The questionnaire ADDRESSES: existing Arctic in situ observing systems,
The questionnaire DOES NOT ADDRESS: data collections obtained by a single instrument (they are the target of questionnaire B).


Questionnaire B: IN SITU DATA COLLECTIONS - ARCTIC ACOUSTIC OBSERVING SYSTEMS
To assess the technological readiness, coverage, resolution, uncertainty, metadata and documentation of selected in-situ data collections that may or may not belong to established networks.
The questionnaire ADDRESSES: existing Arctic in situ data collections
The questionnaire DOES NOT ADDRESS: model-generated data and re-analysis products.

 

 

Figure 1: Spectrogram of 15-min mean acoustic noise levels (NLs) with 0.24Hz frequency resolution from an acoustic experiment carried out in the Fram Strait in August 2012. The main different sound types visible are ice breaking noise (12–50 Hz), seismic exploration noise (20–120Hz, maximum at 40Hz), marine mammal vocalizations (80–500Hz, maximum at 120Hz) and ship engine noise (horizontal lines at 330Hz and various higher frequencies). Increased NLs at hours 50 and 64 are due to hydrophone hits; increased noise at hours 87–89 is due to ship extraordinary ship maneuvering. From Fig. 2 in Geyer et al., 2016.

 

 

Figure 2: Power spectra of 40 Hz noise time series from an acoustic experiment carried out in the Fram Strait in August 2012, zooming in on amplitude modulation periods of seismic airgun noise. All peaks between 8–13 s modulation period were manually identified as seismic airgun noise. From Fig. 6 in Geyer et al., 2016.

 

 

Sources:

Geyer F, Sagen H, Hope G, Babiker M, Worcester PF (2016). Identification and quantification of soundscape components in the Marginal Ice Zone. J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 139 (4), pp 1873–1885 http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4945989

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